Friday, February 10, 2017

My job involves handling a lot of paper, and combined with low humidity here (today it was a whopping 10%) my hands get really dry. I reached for the lotion in my tatting bag...and fortunately noticed this before I put it on my hands....


Sunday, January 29, 2017

Minor Flying Norwegian Dragon

I've been working on a Minor Flying Norwegian Dragon, a free pattern by Anne Bruvold.  She says there are more dragons that haven't been discovered yet, and I think the one I've seen around here is the Desert Sunset Dragon.  Once I finish the green one I have the perfect Southwestern blend for a second one.

I only have the body done so far.  (Forgive the lint; the cat's been sleeping on my sweatpants when I'm not in them.)










The pattern calls for Single Shuttle Split Rings, but I don't have the patience for that just now.  Later on the pattern requires two shuttles, so that's what I started with and just made regular split rings.  I'm using size 10 Lizbeth 680, and the extra bulk of the SSSR was too noticeable in that size thread, too.  (That's my story and I'm sticking with it!)  ☺

The wing pattern was not making sense to me at first, but I think I have it now.  I'll keep you posted!

Monday, January 16, 2017

Rings, split rings and single shuttle split rings

If you're not a tatter, there's probably no way for me to effective describe the difference between rings, split rings and single shuttle split rings.  Rings are basic tatting elements; the shuttle thread makes a ring and comes back to the beginning to meet the ball of thread.  Fine, if you only want rings to the side of the piece.  If you want rings in line, like beads on a thread, you have to use both threads so they can both end at the same place.  This means working with two shuttles, stitching backwards, all sorts of fiddly bits.  If you only have one shuttle, it gets even more complicated.  I have a pattern that I want to make (a flying dragon), that requires single shuttle split rings.  After three tries, I think I have it down.  I can't show you the first one because the ring fell apart completely.  Here are the second and third tries.  The first one became a lower-case "e" because I forgot that the goal was to end at the other side of the ring, not back at the beginning.  The third one came out right.  It's going to take a bit more practice to feel comfortable with the process, but I've made a good start.

I used size 3 thread so I could clearly see what was going on.  The first ring was in size 20, in a solid color, and it was too small to compare with the instructions.